National Association of Federal Retirees
Peel Halton and Area Branch
Branch Pension information:

Pension Information - services ...

• You were asking about the safety of your plan?
• Contact  (Public Service, Canadian Forces, RCMP and Judges Pension queries)

Indexing news:
Pension increases for retired public servants and their survivors are calculated each year using Consumer Price Index (CPI) data published by Statistics Canada. In accordance with the SRBA, the increase is based on a comparison of the twelve-month average of the monthly CPI for the year just ended, to the twelve-month average of the monthly CPI for the previous year.

According to the latest information received by your Branch the pension increases for 2007, as a result of the indexing provisions, were set at 2.3% as of January 1, 2007.

Pension Increase for 2008 - The Treasury Board announced the increase in indexing to be applied to Public Service, Canadian Forces, and RCMP pensions in January 2008. The rate for 2008 was 1.8%.

Pension Increase for 2009 - The Treasury Board announced the increase in indexing to be applied to Public Service, Canadian Forces, and RCMP pensions in January 2009. The rate was 2.5%. For more information check out the National National Association of Federal Retirees blog. Search the national site for pension details: https://www.federalretirees.ca/en/.

Pension Increase for 2011 - The Treasury Board announced the increase in indexing to be applied to public service, Canadian Forces, and RCMP pensions in January 2011. The rate was 1.4%.

Pension Increase for 2012 - The Treasury Board has just announced that the increase in indexing to be applied to public service, Canadian Forces, and RCMP pensions in January 2012 was 2.8%.

Pension Increase for 2013 - The Treasury Board has announced that the increase in indexing to be applied to Public Service, Canadian Forces, and RCMP pensions in January 2013 was 1.9%.

Pension Increase for 2014 - The Treasury Board has just announced that the increase in indexing to be applied to public service, Canadian Forces, and RCMP pensions in January 2014 was 0.9%.

Pension Increase for 2015 - The Treasury Board announced the increase in indexing to be applied to public service, Canadian Forces, and RCMP pensions in January 2015. The rate is 1.7%.

For more information on how pension benefits are protected from inflation, please visit: http://www.tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca/remuneration-compensation/services-pension-services/pension/pubs/pens-annts-01-index-eng.html#pens-annts-01-s6 .


Military PensionsMilitary/RCMP Pensioners


...Against Benefit Reduction at age 65. The purpose of this site is to ensure that all members clearly understand the aim of Bill C-221.
Are you receiving your correct CPP/QPP entitlement?

National Association of Federal Retirees has secured an Affinity Agreement with
The Retirement Planning Institute to provide CPP/QPP benfit audit services at Discount Rates for its members.

Did you know that a significant number of CPP/QPP benefit recipients are in fact receiving less than what they are entitled to?

For more information visit: www.rpi-ipr.com or write to: cpp@rpi-ipr.com

For general information please check out the following sites:


  1. National Association of Federal Retirees - Pension page Your NAFR website governing your pension and related background information ...Including information on: Pension Income Splitting -- Principle Unchallenged at National Conference National Association of Federal Retirees Brief of Pension Splitting!
  2. Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat (TBS) and Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC) present this Web site (http://pensionandbenefits.gc.ca/home-e.html - English http://pensionetavantages-pensionandbenefits.gc.ca/ - Bilingual entry page)) for both active and retired federal public service pension and benefits plan members. This Web site contains valuable information, tools and services regarding your Public Service Pension Plan (PSPP) and Group Benefits Plans.
  3. Canada Pension and Old Age Security plans: (English) ...to view the site in french please click the Income Security Branch - entry page link - above Almost all of today’s seniors receive income from Canada’s Public Pensions. Basic financial support is also available to survivors and to people who become too disabled to work and their children. Income Security Programs delivers these pensions and benefits through the Old Age Security (OAS) program and the Canada Pension Plan (CPP). Together, the OAS and CPP provide a modest base upon which Canadians can build their retirement income. To view your entitlement and rules governing these plans visit the website.
  4. Public Works and Government Services - Federal Public Service Pension Plan (English). This site provides access to:
    - Forms and Application Kits available to print and mail!
    - Publications - Information on your Pension Plan
    - FAQ - Frequently Asked Questions and Answers about your Pension Plan, and
    - Contact Information if you need to contact Public Works and Government Services!
  5. Treasury Board Superannuation site - (English). This site (and booklet) provides a factual, concise explanation of the major terms of the Public Service Superannuation Act (PSSA, or "the Act"), your pension plan. As a new employee or one who has been in the Public Service for some time, you have a vital interest in the benefits this plan provides to you and your family and in the contributions you and your employer make to provide these benefits.

TOP


Useful Superannuation Contact information:


Public Service Pension Office

Superannuation Directorate
Public Works and Government Services Canada
P.O. Box 5010
Shediac, New Brunswick
E4P 9B4

Fax: 1 506 533 5989

All areas in Canada, as well as areas outside Canada served by the AT & T have access to toll free services:
1 800 561 7930 (English)
1 800 561 7935 (French)

Outside Canada and the United States, (not served by AT & T) call collect:
1 506 533 5800

Telecommunication device for hearing-impaired persons (TDD System) is also available. If you own a TDD system, call 533 5990 for Shediac/Moncton area or for all other areas in Canada call 1 506 533 5990.

Canadian Forces Pension Office

DAPPP/PS National Defence Headquarters
Constitution Building
305 Rideau Street
Ottawa, Ontario
K1A 0K2

Fax 1 613 996 9984
Canadian Forces Pension website
Pension cheques, source deductions, mailing addresses, bank accounts, death notices, etc.
Phone: 1 800 267 0350
Ottawa Region: 952 9933

Other questions about release and pension:
Phone: 1 800 267 0325
Ottawa Region: 996 7980

Royal Canadian Mounted Police Pension Office

RCMP Benefits Administration Centre
c/o Morneau Sobeco
1060 University Street, 9th Floor
Montréal, QC
H3B 4V3

RCMP Website
Phone: 1800 661 7595

Judge Pensioners

Telephone Contact:
Toll free: 1 877 583 4266
Ottawa Region: 995 5140

TOP

How Safe is my Superannuation Plan?

The following is the National Association of Federal Retirees position/answer on this question:

"...The plans (PSSA, CFSA, RCMPSA) governing the pensions payable to federal superannuates are defined benefit pension plans and the employer behind those plans is the government of Canada. Therefore, these plans may be seen as the most secure (or least insecure) pension plans that exist, as the financial risk under a defined benefit plan is normally borne by the employer and as the employer, in this case, is much less subject to bankruptcy than a private enterprise.

The fact that new monies from the federal public sector plans have started in year 2000 being invested in the private markets does not really affect the above two points.

Firstly, even if the plans' assets are now segregated into an Account (moneys invested in notional government securities until 1999) and a Fund (monies invested in private markets since 2000), this is purely an administrative consideration for all current and future pensioners, as pensions are paid from the same "old" plans (PSSA, CFSA, RCMPSA), which have not been replaced but rather subject to some changes in 2000.

Secondly, actuarial gains and losses may emerge anytime from various sources, investments being only one of them (two other main examples are wage increases and inflation). Whenever an actuarial gain or loss is identified in any of the statutory triennial actuarial reports, the government contribution rates are adjusted (reduced or increased) accordingly for the ensuing three years.

Nevertheless, all of this does not mean that pensioners can be totally complacent about the security of their pensions. ...And obviously this is why National Association of Federal Retirees organization exists.

The main concern one may have in respect of a public sector pension plan is that the plan sponsor has unlimited legislative powers. Such powers were used in 1982 for limiting the pension indexation rate to 6% and 5% for 1983 and 1984 (thereby reducing the amount of pensions that would otherwise have applied for the lifetime of those then already in receipt of a pension) , which is the subject of National Association of Federal Retirees standing resolution number 3.

More recently through 1999 Bill C-78, the government allowed itself to withdraw (and actually did since) the pension surplus of about $30 billion from the three above-mentioned pension plans. This has not led to an explicit decrease in pensions but has nonetheless, among other things, largely limited the plan sponsor's margin of manoeuvre whenever deficits would eventually emerge. When such deficits would emerge, the government would then be inclined to reduce pension benefits rather than increase income taxes (from which the employer's contributions are taken in this case)..."

TOP


















...problem with this page? Please contact: webmaster@federalretireesph.com. Thank you!